Hassleblad Practice.

For my Independent Study project, I decided that I wanted to work with film.
For what I want to be able to achieve for this brief, I decided that working with Medium Format film would be suitable. For me to be able to go ahead and do this, I needed to understand the Hassleblad in more depth!

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Above: Me working with the Hassleblad and all my equipment (thank you to my friend for taking this for me!) . Below: the camera I used.

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Throughout my 2-3 years of studying at UCA, I have never once picked up a Hassleblad… I know, I’ve left it a little late (but hey! Better late than never!).
I managed to hire out the beauty above and get a one-to-one tutorial with Paul the Techie who lives in what us Photography students call it the “Fish Tank” office… (the office is literally a big window in the wall and it looks like a larger version of a fish tank.) The tutorial with Paul was really helpful – he went through a quick recap of how everything works – loading the film, how to take the back off the camera, the aperture rings and shutter speed.

Above are some of the images from the roll of 120mm film from my practice shoot with the Hassleblad.(To enlarge the photographs, just click on the image).
I understand these pictures have nothing to do with my project and in all fairness I did enjoy stepping away from my project, but I wanted the opportunity to go out and get use to handling the Hassleblad before going ahead with any shoots I organise in the studio.
After my tutorial with Paul the Techie, I went away from the “Fish Tank” feeling very excited and extremely eager to take photographs – just the thought of darkroom chemicals was enough to send me crazy!
I took a stroll with my two friends and was able to walk away from the meadows feeling very confident and enthusiastic about Medium Format,  and to top the day off I instantly fell in love with the Hassleblad!
When shooting my practice film with the Hassleblad I found it very confusing at first – every movement and angle is so sensitive compared to most cameras I have handled and I discovered I am better of using a tripod to help steady my shakey hands when taking the photographs. But once I got use to the sensitivity I was able to steady myself and I managed to find a mutual bond with the camera (only photographers will understand this bond – you just instantly know how to work the camera!).
I feel that I am still new to this whole Hassleblad craze, but I know the more shoots I do with this camera, the more I will gain confidence and produce top-notch photographs for this project!